Unfinished Projects – Hexagon Crochet Throw

Hello Everyone,

I recently moved house and when packing up my sewing room I came a cross a few unfinished projects. I mostly sew but I also like to knit and crochet.
We spent a lot of time and money on rubbish removal and getting rid of things that we didn’t need anymore. Three of my four children moved out recently and we have lived in the same house for nearly 20 years. We still had a hard time finding a spot for everything in our new home. Therefore, decided to finish some of my unfinished projects.

The first project I got out was this crochet throw. The pattern is from a Better Homes & Garden (Australia) Magazine, May 2015. So I probably started it during 2015. I can’t find any online reference to the pattern, it was called Bianca Crochet Blanket in the magazine.
I have made a few changes, I always do. The individual hexagons are crocheted following the pattern but I have made changes to the layout and number of colours.

The original pattern is made up of 307 hexagons using 15 different colours of wool yarn. Instead I am using three different colours in a soft acrylic yarn.
I have changed the layout by not having “background hexagons” around the hexagon flower, and letting the hexagon flowers connect to each other. It makes the shape and size of the throw a bit more challenging, but I think it looks a lot prettier.

This is still an unfinished project but I have started to work on it again and I intend to finish it. I will probably have to make a few partial hexagon flowers to even up the edge.
At the moment it measures 105 cm (42″) by 90 cm (36″) at the widest points. I’m hoping I have enough yarn to make it big enough for a single bed. I will let you know how it turns out…

Until next time, happy sewing (or crocheting) and take care!

Annika

Big and Small Zipper Pouch

Big and Small Zipper Pouch PDF Sewing Pattern

Hello Everyone!

I have a new PDF Sewing Pattern in my Etsy Shop. It is called Big and Small Zipper Pouches. Zipper Pouches is very fun to sew and has so many uses. I think it is almost impossible to have too many of them. Very often it is enough to use leftover fabric scraps and zippers. They can also easily be made in to any size.

This pattern is, like my other patterns, an easy to follow tutorial style instructions with lots of photos. There is three files to download. One is with all the instructions, one is the pattern pieces for printing on letter sized paper and one is the pattern pieces for printing on A4 size paper. The files with the pattern pieces you have to print and cut out. Make sure the page scaling is set to none, actual size or 100% on your printer.

Size: Big – Width 9 1/2″, Height 6 1/2″, Depth at the base 2″
Small – Width 8 1/2″, Height 3 1/2″, Depth at base 2″

If the outer fabric is oil cloth/vinyl/pleather or similar you may not need the batting. Remember to not iron or use pins when using these materials.

Materials (big pouch):
• 12” (30 cm) square of outer/main fabric
• 12″x10” (30x25cm) of contrast fabric for base
• 10″x25″ (25x60cm) of lining fabric
• 8” (20 cm) or zipper
• 15” x 20” (40x50cm) of iron on woven interfacing (light or medium weight)
• 15” x 20” (40x50cm) of thin iron on batting

Materials (small pouch):
• 10” (25 cm) square of outer/main fabric
• 10″x8” (25x20cm) of contrast fabric for base
• 12″ (30cm) square of lining fabric
• 8” (20 cm) or zipper
• 12″ (30cm) of iron on woven interfacing (light or medium weight)
• 12″ (30cm) of thin iron on batting

I hope you enjoy this pattern! Please tag me on instagram if you are posting your finished projects.

Until next time, happy sewing and take care!

Annika

Fabric Scrap Piecing

Hello Everyone,

I have made another fabric scrap project. Instead of crumb piecing as in my last post, I cut the left over fabric in to 1 1/2” x 2 1/2” rectangles. When pieced together in pairs along the 2 1/2” edge, the pairs become 2 1/2” squares and if pieced together in alternating directions it turns in to a basket weave like pattern.

I made this table runner the same way I made the wall hanging in my last post minus the hanging sleeve. You can find that post here.
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Fabric Scraps – Crumb Piecing

Hello Everyone!

I decided to organise my left over fabric scraps so it was easier to find what I need and also to use them and not always buy new fabrics. Don’t get me wrong fabric shopping is a very fun and addictive thing to do and the best retail therapy. But scrap fabric projects is very fun too and it is impossible to throw away fabric. One way to use left over fabric, especially small pieces is crumb piecing. If you search crumb quilts in Pinterest, you will find many tutorials and projects. Here is how I made my first Crumb Pieced mini wall hanging:

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The Everything Pouch

Hello Everyone,

The Everything Pouch is my newest PDF sewing pattern and it comes with pattern pieces in three different sizes. It has no exposed seams or seams covered with binding. The finished measurements are:

Small – H: 3 ¼”  W: 4 ½” D: 2 ½”
Medium –  H: 3 ¼” W: 8 ½”  D: 2 ½”
Large – H: 5 ½”  W: 9 ½” D: 2 ½”

The large size works great as a toiletries / make up bag.
The medium size works great as a pencil case
The small size is great for things like binding clips, hair ties etc.

To make all three pouches you will need:

  • 15″ (38 cm) outer fabric ( fat quarter is sufficient if print is non directional)
  • 10” (25 cm) contrast fabric for zipper panels and tabs
  • 15″ (38 cm) lining fabric ( fat quarter is sufficient if print is non directional)
  • 20” (50 cm) medium weight woven interfacing
  • 8”, 12”,16″ (20, 30, 40 cm) or longer dress zippers, 1” (2.5 cm) wide
  • Sewing machine with zipper foot 
  • General sewing supplies

All measurements are based on 42” (112 cm) wide fabric. 

Of course you can make them in all different fabrics, which also makes it a great scrap fabric project. This project is best suited for the intermediate sewer.

I hope you like this pattern as much as I do. The combinations of different fabrics and colours are endless, and the pouch can be used for everything also.

Until next time, take care and happy sewing!

Annika